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Wednesday, June 12, 2024

1930’s Ginger Sponge Parkin – Lavender and Lovage


1930’s Ginger Sponge Parkin – A lovely old recipe from the early BeRo recipe books. Serve this as a cake, or as a pudding with custard or cream

1930's Ginger Sponge Parkin
1930's Ginger Sponge Parkin

1930’s Ginger Sponge Parkin is a fabulous recipe, that first featured in the earliest BeRo cookbooks, from the 1920’s and 1930’s.

It’s a recipe that I know well, as both my grandmother and mother used to bake this light ginger sponge cake regularly.

I personally wouldn’t call it a Parkin, although the original name in the BeRo books calls it BeRo Sponge Parkin.

1930's Ginger Sponge Parkin

I always associate a parkin with a particular type of ginger cake that has oatmeal in it; but, what’s in a name – it’s a ginger cake, parkin or not!

Whatever the name, it is a wonderfully light sponge cake with a real ginger kick, and it makes a fabulous pudding when served with custard.

Nanny used to serve this 1930’s Ginger Sponge Parkin in big slabs, as she used to bake it in a roasting tin.

1930's Ginger Sponge Parkin

She probably doubled the recipe, as I remember there was at least 14 to 16 large squares, which she used to serve on an old Blue Willow plate.

A photo of the original recipe is shared below, as the recipe in my recipe card was tweaked a wee bit.

This was served as a hot pudding last time I made it, after Sunday Lunch, and it went down a storm with our dinner guest, as well as my husband.

1930's Ginger Sponge Parkin

Serve this as a hot pudding with custard, cream, creme fraiche or with ice cream for that hot and cold sensation.

It’s equally as good as part of a Sunday Tea TrayElevenses , High Tea, or for the school and office lunch box.

However you serve it, I hope you all enjoy this lovely retro recipe. and please do let me know in the comments below if you make it, Karen

1930's Ginger Sponge Parkin
Be-Ro Vintage Book
  • Can be baked in a large loaf tin, or two loaf tins.
  • Add extra ground ginger for a fiery extra ginger kick.
  • Keeps for up to 2 weeks in an airtight tin.
  • Serve it buttered, or warm with custard for a pudding.
1930's Ginger Sponge Parkin
1930's Ginger Sponge Parkin

1930’s Ginger Sponge Parkin

Yield:
12

Prep Time:
20 minutes

Cook Time:
1 hour 30 minutes

Total Time:
1 hour 50 minutes

1930’s Ginger Sponge Parkin is a fabulous recipe, that first featured in the earliest BeRo cookbooks, from the 1920’s and 1930’s.

It’s a recipe that I know well, as both my grandmother and mother used to bake this light ginger sponge cake regularly.

I personally wouldn’t call it a Parkin, although the original name in the BeRo books calls it BeRo Sponge Parkin.

I always associate a parkin with a particular type of ginger cake that has oatmeal in it; but, what’s in a name – it’s a ginger cake, parkin or not!

Whatever the name, it is a wonderfully light sponge cake with a real ginger kick, and it makes a fabulous pudding when served with custard.

Nanny used to serve this 1930’s Ginger Sponge Parkin in big slabs, as she used to bake it in a roasting tin.

She probably doubled the recipe, as I remember there was at least 14 to 16 large squares, which she used to serve on an old Blue Willow plate.

This was served as a hot pudding last time I made it, after Sunday Lunch, and it went down a storm with our dinner guest, as well as my husband.

Serve this as a hot pudding with custard, cream, creme fraiche or with ice cream for that hot and cold sensation.

It’s equally as good as part of a Sunday Tea Tray, Elevenses , High Tea, or for the school and office lunch box.

Ingredients

  • 450g Self Raising Flour
  • Pinch of salt
  • 2 heaped teaspoons ground ginger
  • 225g caster sugar
  • 50g butter
  • 225g black treacle
  • 1 egg beaten with 140mls milk

Instructions

  1. Mix the flour, salt, ground ginger and caster sugar together in a mixing bowl.
  2. Heat the butter and black treacle together, in a saucepan or in the microwave – do NOT boil.
  3. Pour the black trteacle mixture into the dry ingredients, mix together, adding the egg and milk mixture to the batter gradually.
  4. Mix thoroughly.
  5. Pour into a greased, shallow baking tray – I used a 9″ x 9″ square tin (22cm x 22cm) My grandmother used to use a roastig tin.
  6. Bake at 180C/375F/Gas mark 4 for 1 hour to an hour and a half.
  7. Remove from the oven and when cool, cut into squares.

Notes

Can be baked in a large loaf tin, or two loaf tins.

Add extra ground ginger for a fiery extra ginger kick.

Keeps for up to 2 weeks in an airtight tin.

Serve it buttered, or warm with custard for a pudding.

Nutrition Information

Yield 12

Serving Size 1

Amount Per Serving

Calories 248Total Fat 4gSaturated Fat 2gTrans Fat 0gUnsaturated Fat 2gCholesterol 25mgSodium 497mgCarbohydrates 47gFiber 1gSugar 19gProtein 5g

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